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Women and the Canadian State/Les femmes et l'Etat canadien

Author : ,

ISBN10 : 0773566090

Publisher : McGill-Queen\'s Press - MQUP

Number of Pages : 392

Category : Social Science

Viewed : 530

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Book Summary: Awareness of the history of the interaction between women and the Canadian state is central to understanding and evaluating action in the present and in the future. Women and the Canadian State makes an important contribution to the ongoing debate. Contributors include Dyane Adam, Naomi Alboim, Pat Armstrong, Monique Bégin, Florence Bird, Claire Bonenfant, Lorenne M.G. Clark, Maria de Koninck, Martha Flaherty, Catherine Frazee, Nitya Iyer, Jane Jenson, Diane Lamoureux, Marie Lavigne, Wendy Moss, Mary Jane Mossman, Marie Murphy, Teressa Anne Nahanee, Maureen O'Neil, Freda L. Paltiel, Carol Smart, Joanne St Lewis, Nancy Sullivan, Sharon Sutherland, Mary Ellen Turpel (Aki-Kwe), and Jane Ursel.

Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Volume One: Summary

Author : The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

ISBN10 : 1459410696

Publisher : James Lorimer & Company

Number of Pages : 392

Category : History

Viewed : 769

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Book Summary: This is the Final Report of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission and its six-year investigation of the residential school system for Aboriginal youth and the legacy of these schools. This report, the summary volume, includes the history of residential schools, the legacy of that school system, and the full text of the Commission's 94 recommendations for action to address that legacy. This report lays bare a part of Canada's history that until recently was little-known to most non-Aboriginal Canadians. The Commission discusses the logic of the colonization of Canada's territories, and why and how policy and practice developed to end the existence of distinct societies of Aboriginal peoples. Using brief excerpts from the powerful testimony heard from Survivors, this report documents the residential school system which forced children into institutions where they were forbidden to speak their language, required to discard their clothing in favour of institutional wear, given inadequate food, housed in inferior and fire-prone buildings, required to work when they should have been studying, and subjected to emotional, psychological and often physical abuse. In this setting, cruel punishments were all too common, as was sexual abuse. More than 30,000 Survivors have been compensated financially by the Government of Canada for their experiences in residential schools, but the legacy of this experience is ongoing today. This report explains the links to high rates of Aboriginal children being taken from their families, abuse of drugs and alcohol, and high rates of suicide. The report documents the drastic decline in the presence of Aboriginal languages, even as Survivors and others work to maintain their distinctive cultures, traditions, and governance. The report offers 94 calls to action on the part of governments, churches, public institutions and non-Aboriginal Canadians as a path to meaningful reconciliation of Canada today with Aboriginal citizens. Even though the historical experience of residential schools constituted an act of cultural genocide by Canadian government authorities, the United Nation's declaration of the rights of aboriginal peoples and the specific recommendations of the Commission offer a path to move from apology for these events to true reconciliation that can be embraced by all Canadians.

Canada's Residential Schools: The Legacy

Author : Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada

ISBN10 : 0773598286

Publisher : McGill-Queen\'s Press - MQUP

Number of Pages : 391

Category : Social Science

Viewed : 1848

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Book Summary: Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to “civilize and Christianize” Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools’ former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission’s final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada’s Residential Schools: The Legacy describes what Canada must do to overcome the schools’ tragic legacy and move towards reconciliation with the country’s first peoples. For over 125 years Aboriginal children suffered abuse and neglect in residential schools run by the Canadian government and by churches. They were taken from their families and communities and confined in large, frightening institutions where they were cut off from their culture and punished for speaking their own language. Infectious diseases claimed the lives of many students and those who survived lived in harsh and alienating conditions. There was little compassion and little education in most of Canada’s residential schools. Although Canada has formally apologized for the residential school system and has compensated its Survivors, the damaging legacy of the schools continues to this day. This volume examines the long shadow that the residential schools have cast over the lives of Aboriginal Canadians who are more likely to live in poverty, more likely to be in ill health and die sooner, more likely to have their children taken from them, and more likely to be imprisoned than other Canadians. The disappearance of many Indigenous languages and the erosion of cultural traditions and languages also have their roots in residential schools.

The Competitiveness of Global Port-Cities

Author : OECD

ISBN10 : 9264205276

Publisher : OECD Publishing

Number of Pages : 272

Category : ,

Viewed : 1201

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Book Summary: Ports and cities are historically strongly linked, but the link between port and city growth has become weaker. This book examines how ports can regain their role as drivers of urban economic growth and how negative port impacts can be mitigated.

Global Citizenship Education

Author : Aboagye Eva,S. Nombuso Dlamini

ISBN10 : 1487533985

Publisher : University of Toronto Press

Number of Pages : 344

Category : Education

Viewed : 1566

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Book Summary: The idea of citizenship and conceptions of what it means to be a good citizen has evolved over time. On the one hand, good citizenship entails the ability to live with others in diverse societies, and to promote a common set of values of acceptance, human rights, and democracy. On the other hand, in order to compete in the global economy, nations require a more innovative, autonomous, inventive, and reflective workforce, meaning good citizens are also those who successfully participate in the economic development of themselves and their country. At the same time, supporting citizens to realize their responsibilities beyond the nation has become important in this rapidly changing and interconnected world. These competing citizenship purposes often compel people to either ignore or act ambivalent to democratic and human rights values. That is, profit-driven labor exploitation, for instance, contradicts human rights and democratic tenants. Thus, global citizenship education is fundamental to teaching, learning and redressing sociopolitical, economic and environmental exploitation, globally. Detailing its historical development to be recognized as a field of study, Global Citizenship Education provides a critical discourse on global citizenship education (GCE). Authors in this collection offer underpinnings of global citizenship education by discussing its contemporary theories and methodologies, and specific case studies that illustrate the application of GCE initiatives. Aboagye and Dlamini aim to motivate learners and educators in post-secondary institutions not only to understand the issues of social and economic inequality, political and civil unrest facing us, but also to take action that will lead to equitable change in local and global spaces.