Three Years In The Confederate Horse Artillery - [PDF] Full eBook Download

Three Years In The Confederate Horse Artillery

Author :

ISBN10 : 1782898654

Publisher : Pickle Partners Publishing

Number of Pages : 272

Category : History

Viewed : 965

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Book Summary: The diarists and memorialists of the Civil War from both sides give copious information on their branches of service; infantry, foot artillery, cavalry, however, few who served in the horse artillery wrote of their experiences. Thankfully George Neese of the Confederate Horse Artillery left his diary entries to posterity affording the reader an intimate, honest look into this neglected arm. Neese enlisted in Chew’s battery in 1861, and would fight in that unit until his capture in 1864. He and his comrades fought under Jackson in the famed Valley campaign at Kernstown and Cedar Mountain; under Stuart he was engaged heavily at the Battle of Brandy Station. Later in the war under Imboden he saw action at the retreat from Gettysburg, the Wilderness and Spotslvania and the ‘Crater’. His capture and imprisonment at the notorious Point Lookout prison are particularly poignant reminders of the brutality of war. Highly recommended.

Custer at Gettysburg

Author : Phillip Thomas Tucker

ISBN10 : 0811768929

Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield

Number of Pages : 480

Category : History

Viewed : 1540

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Book Summary: George Armstrong Custer is famous for his fatal defeat at the Little Bighorn in 1876, but Custer’s baptism of fire came during the Civil War. After graduating last in the West Point class of 1861, Custer served from the First Battle of Bull Run (only a month after graduation) through Appomattox, where he witnessed the surrender. But Custer’s true rise to prominence began at Gettysburg in 1863. On the eve of the Battle of Gettysburg, only twenty-three years old and barely two years removed from being the goat of his West Point class, Custer received promotion to brigadier general and command – his first direct field command – of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade, the “Wolverines.” Now that he held general rank, Custer felt comfortable wearing the distinctive, some said gaudy, uniform that helped skyrocket him into fame and legend. However flashy he may have been in style, Custer did not disappoint his superiors, who promoted him in a search for more aggressive cavalry officers. At approximately noon on July 3, 1863, Custer and his men heard enemy cannon fire: Stuart’s signal to Lee that he was ready for action. Thus began the melee that was East Cavalry Field at Gettysburg. Much back and forth preceded Custer’s career-defining action. An hour or two into the battle, after many of his cavalrymen had been reduced to hand-to-hand infantry-style fighting, Custer ordered a charge of one of his regiments and led it into action himself, screaming one of the battle’s most famous lines: “Come on, you Wolverines!” Around three o’clock, Stuart mounted a final charge, which mowed down Union cavalry – until it ran into Custer’s Wolverines, who stood firm, with Custer wielding a sword at their head, and broke the Confederates’ last attack. In a book combining two popular subjects, Tucker recounts the story of Custer at Gettysburg with verve, shows how the Custer legend was born on the fields of the war’s most famous battle, and offers eye-opening new perspectives on Gettysburg’s overlooked cavalry battle.

One Continuous Fight

Author : Eric J. Wittenberg,J. David Petruzzi,Michael Nugent

ISBN10 : 1611210348

Publisher : Savas Beatie

Number of Pages : 576

Category : History

Viewed : 1936

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Book Summary: The titanic three-day battle of Gettysburg left 50,000 casualties in its wake, a battered Southern army far from its base of supplies, and a rich historiographic legacy. Thousands of books and articles cover nearly every aspect of the battle, but not a single volume focuses on the military aspects of the monumentally important movements of the armies to and across the Potomac River. One Continuous Fight: The Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, July 4-14, 1863 is the first detailed military history of Lee’s retreat and the Union effort to catch and destroy the wounded Army of Northern Virginia. Against steep odds and encumbered with thousands of casualties, Confederate commander Robert E. Lee’s post-battle task was to successfully withdraw his army across the Potomac River. Union commander George G. Meade’s equally difficult assignment was to intercept the effort and destroy his enemy. The responsibility for defending the exposed Southern columns belonged to cavalry chieftain James Ewell Brown (Jeb) Stuart. If Stuart fumbled his famous ride north to Gettysburg, his generalship during the retreat more than redeemed his flagging reputation. The ten days of retreat triggered nearly two dozen skirmishes and major engagements, including fighting at Granite Hill, Monterey Pass, Hagerstown, Williamsport, Funkstown, Boonsboro, and Falling Waters. President Abraham Lincoln was thankful for the early July battlefield victory, but disappointed that General Meade was unable to surround and crush the Confederates before they found safety on the far side of the Potomac. Exactly what Meade did to try to intercept the fleeing Confederates, and how the Southerners managed to defend their army and ponderous 17-mile long wagon train of wounded until crossing into western Virginia on the early morning of July 14, is the subject of this study One Continuous Fight draws upon a massive array of documents, letters, diaries, newspaper accounts, and published primary and secondary sources. These long-ignored foundational sources allow the authors, each widely known for their expertise in Civil War cavalry operations, to describe carefully each engagement. The result is a rich and comprehensive study loaded with incisive tactical commentary, new perspectives on the strategic role of the Southern and Northern cavalry, and fresh insights on every engagement, large and small, fought during the retreat. The retreat from Gettysburg was so punctuated with fighting that a soldier felt compelled to describe it as “One Continuous Fight.” Until now, few students fully realized the accuracy of that description. Complimented with 18 original maps, dozens of photos, and a complete driving tour with GPS coordinates of the entire retreat, One Continuous Fight is an essential book for every student of the American Civil War in general, and for the student of Gettysburg in particular. About the Authors: Eric J. Wittenberg has written widely on Civil War cavalry operations. His books include Glory Enough for All (2002), The Union Cavalry Comes of Age (2003), and The Battle of Monroe's Crossroads and the Civil War's Final Campaign (2005). He lives in Columbus, Ohio. J. David Petruzzi is the author of several magazine articles on Eastern Theater cavalry operations, conducts tours of cavalry sites of the Gettysburg Campaign, and is the author of the popular "Buford's Boys" website at www.bufordsboys.com. Petruzzi lives in Brockway, Pennsylvania. A long time student of the Gettysburg Campaign, Michael Nugent is a retired US Army Armored Cavalry Officer and the descendant of a Civil War Cavalry soldier. He has previously written for several military publications. Nugent lives in Wells, Maine.

Stonewall Jackson's 1862 Valley Campaign

Author : Jonathan A. Noyalas

ISBN10 : 1614230404

Publisher : Arcadia Publishing

Number of Pages : 160

Category : History

Viewed : 793

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Book Summary: Virginia's Shenandoah Valley was known as the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy" due to its ample harvests and transportation centers, its role as an avenue of invasion into the North and its capacity to serve as a diversionary theater of war. The region became a magnet for both Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War, and nearly half of the thirteen major battles fought in the valley occurred as part of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's 1862 Valley Campaign. Civil War historian Jonathan A. Noyalas examines Jackson's Valley Campaign and how those victories brought hope to an infant Confederate nation, transformed the lives of the Shenandoah Valley's civilians and emerged as Stonewall Jackson's defining moment.

Confederate Artillery Organizations

Author : F. Ray Sibley, Jr.

ISBN10 : 1940669448

Publisher : Savas Publishing

Number of Pages : 390

Category : History

Viewed : 1651

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Book Summary: Confederate Artillery Organizations: An Alphabetical Listing of the Officers and Batteries of the Confederacy, 1861–1865 is a remarkable, immensely useful, and exceedingly rare book containing the names of the officers and every Confederate artillery unit. It is so rare that most scholars in the field don’t even know of its existence. It was originally published as simply Confederate Artillery Organizations by the U.S. War Department in 1898, one of Marcus J.Wright’s compilation aids to help assemble and organize the massive publication that would appear as the 128-volume The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (1880-1901), known to researchers and students alike as simply Official Records. Editor Ray Sibley spent more than a decade researching the thousands of entries, correcting mistakes, and adding many artillery units and additional officers unknown to the original compilers more than a century ago. Sibley utilized archival records, manuscripts, letters, diaries, and other sources to verify the original work, correct mistakes, and add further useful information in the form of hundreds of valuable footnotes. This new updated and easy-to-use reference work sets forth the linage of the Confederate artillery. It lists, in alphabetical order, individual batteries to artillery regiments, the names and alternate names for the batteries and the names of the men who led them. Also included are the dates of acceptance into Confederate service for each unit. Most companies have an annotation that includes an alternate name (if there was one), and the date if a unit disbanded or was merged into another organization.The annotations for officers include date of appointment, date of promotion to a higher grade (if any), date of transfers (if any), date dropped from rolls (if any), and date relieved of command (if any). Confederate Artillery Organizations also contains four rare and hard-to-find lists of Confederate artillery officers: “Memorandum of Artillery Officers, C. S. A.,” “List of Officers Corps of Artillery, C. S. Army, on U.S. Register of 1861,” “Superintendents of Armories,” and “Military Store-Keeper of Ordnance.” These lists illustrate the ranking of each officer in his respective grade. The extensive bibliography prepared by Mr. Sibley is an invaluable guide to Civil War historiography. Scholars, researchers, and students of the Civil War will be thankful Ray Sibley turned his considerable talents to this project. His tireless efforts made sure this rare book got back into print (including all digital formats), and turned what was once a valuable rare work into a reference book that is now both widely available and absolutely indispensable.

The 4th North Carolina Cavalry in the Civil War

Author : Neil Hunter Raiford

ISBN10 : 1476604126

Publisher : McFarland

Number of Pages : 302

Category : History

Viewed : 396

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Book Summary: In April 1862, the Civil War was entering its second year and North Carolina was rallying to supply more troops for the Confederacy. The Partisan Ranger Act, passed by the Confederate Congress on April 21, prompted local leaders to recruit companies of irregular soldiers for service in the Confederate Army. Seven such companies were banded together into a regiment to form the 4th North Carolina Cavalry: a true cross-section of North Carolina, it contained soldiers from the largest urban areas and smallest rural areas from fifteen counties. This history of the 4th North Carolina Cavalry is based largely on primary source material—the official records, letters, diaries and recollections of the soldiers. The 4th North Carolina saw action in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, and was a part of General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. The roster comprises a large part of the book and provides biographical, genealogical and military information about each soldier.

Three Days in the Shenandoah

Author : Gary Ecelbarger

ISBN10 : 0806153393

Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press

Number of Pages : 288

Category : History

Viewed : 1087

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Book Summary: The battles of Front Royal and Winchester are the stuff of Civil War legend. Stonewall Jackson swept away an isolated Union division under the command of Nathaniel Banks and made his presence in the northern Shenandoah Valley so frightful a prospect that it triggered an overreaction from President Lincoln, yielding huge benefits for the Confederacy. Gary Ecelbarger has undertaken a comprehensive reassessment of those battles to show their influence on both war strategy and the continuation of the conflict. Three Days in the Shenandoah answers questions that have perplexed historians for generations. Bypassing long-overused sources that have shrouded the Valley Campaign in myth, Ecelbarger draws instead on newly uncovered primary sources—including soldiers’ accounts and officers’ reports—to refute much of the anecdotal lore that for too long was regarded as fact. He narrates those suspenseful days of combat from the perspective of battlefield participants and high commanders to weave a compelling story of strategy and tactics. And he offers new conclusions regarding Lincoln’s military meddling as commander in chief, grants Jefferson Davis more credit for the campaign than previous accounts have given him, and commends Union soldiers for their fighting. Written with the flair of a seasoned military historian and enlivened with maps and illustrations, Three Days in the Shenandoah reinterprets this important episode. Ecelbarger sets a new standard for envisioning the Shenandoah Campaign that will both fascinate Civil War buffs and engage historians.

Georgia in the Confederacy

Author : Joseph Derry

ISBN10 : 1257710931

Publisher : Lulu Press, Inc

Number of Pages : N.A

Category : History

Viewed : 1343

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Book Summary: This is a reprint of book 5 of the Confederate Military History series. It details all of the acton and events that took place in Georgia during the Civil War.

Shepherdstown in the Civil War

Author : Kevin R. Pawlak

ISBN10 : 162585465X

Publisher : Arcadia Publishing

Number of Pages : 176

Category : History

Viewed : 1505

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Book Summary: Because they were situated near the Mason-Dixon line, Shepherdstown residents witnessed the realities of the Civil War firsthand. Marching armies, sounds of battle and fear of war had arrived on their doorsteps by the summer of 1862. The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 brought thousands of wounded Confederates into the town's homes, churches and warehouses. The story of Shepherdstown's transformation into "one vast hospital" recounts nightmarish scenes of Confederate soldiers under the caring hands of an army of surgeons and civilians. Author Kevin R. Pawlak retraces the horrific accounts of Shepherdstown as a Civil War hospital town.

South Carolina In The Confederacy

Author : Brig.Gen. Ellison Capers

ISBN10 : 1257731742

Publisher : Lulu Press, Inc

Number of Pages : N.A

Category : History

Viewed : 463

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Book Summary: This is a reprint of book 5 of the Confederate Military History series detailing all of the action and events that took place in South Carolina during the Civil War.

Journey to Armageddon

Author : Kevin A. Campbell

ISBN10 : 1796035335

Publisher : Xlibris Corporation

Number of Pages : 990

Category : History

Viewed : 356

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Book Summary: Once again, the soldiers, officers, and commanders tell the story in this third volume of Kevin Campbell’s comprehensive work on the Gettysburg Campaign, Journey to Armageddon. The hardships, comradery, short rations, and the dance with the enemy’s bullets and shells are all here. Blistering sun, drenching rains, chocking dust, sticky mud, played out horses and men, and the high-level, often inharmoniousness communications between army commanders and their governments are presented in these pages. Fortunately, not all is despair and doom. Included are the sometimes-humorous interactions with the civilians met along their journey and the acrimony that frequently filled encounters between hungry soldiers and the administrators of the villages and towns they passed through. The tales told by these hardy men about the events of their existence are significant elements within the story of the Gettysburg Campaign, which author Kevin Campbell tells in a clear and concise prose. Most historians who write of the great crusade gloss over these events in favor of the more prominent proceedings in and around Gettysburg. These often-ignored events and much more are incorporated into his complete treatment of the Union and Confederate armies on their journey to Armageddon.

Christmas in America

Author : Penne L. Restad

ISBN10 : 0199923582

Publisher : Oxford University Press

Number of Pages : 240

Category : Social Science

Viewed : 515

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Book Summary: The manger or Macy's? Americans might well wonder which is the real shrine of Christmas, as they take part each year in a mix of churchgoing, shopping, and family togetherness. But the history of Christmas cannot be summed up so easily as the commercialization of a sacred day. As Penne Restad reveals in this marvelous new book, it has always been an ambiguous meld of sacred thoughts and worldly actions-- as well as a fascinating reflection of our changing society. In Christmas in America, Restad brilliantly captures the rise and transformation of our most universal national holiday. In colonial times, it was celebrated either as an utterly solemn or a wildly social event--if it was celebrated at all. Virginians hunted, danced, and feasted. City dwellers flooded the streets in raucous demonstrations. Puritan New Englanders denounced the whole affair. Restad shows that as times changed, Christmas changed--and grew in popularity. In the early 1800s, New York served as an epicenter of the newly emerging holiday, drawing on its roots as a Dutch colony (St. Nicholas was particularly popular in the Netherlands, even after the Reformation), and aided by such men as Washington Irving. In 1822, another New Yorker named Clement Clarke Moore penned a poem now known as "'Twas the Night Before Christmas," virtually inventing the modern Santa Claus. Well-to-do townspeople displayed a German novelty, the decorated fir tree, in their parlors; an enterprising printer discovered the money to be made from Christmas cards; and a hodgepodge of year-end celebrations began to coalesce around December 25 and the figure of Santa. The homecoming significance of the holiday increased with the Civil War, and by the end of the nineteenth century a full- fledged national holiday had materialized, forged out of borrowed and invented custom alike, and driven by a passion for gift-giving. In the twentieth century, Christmas seeped into every niche of our conscious and unconscious lives to become a festival of epic proportions. Indeed, Restad carries the story through to our own time, unwrapping the messages hidden inside countless movies, books, and television shows, revealing the inescapable presence--and ambiguous meaning--of Christmas in contemporary culture. Filled with colorful detail and shining insight, Christmas in America reveals not only much about the emergence of the holiday, but also what our celebrations tell us about ourselves. From drunken revelry along colonial curbstones to family rituals around the tree, from Thomas Nast drawing the semiofficial portrait of St. Nick to the making of the film Home Alone, Restad's sparkling account offers much to amuse and ponder.

TIME-LIFE The Civil War in 500 Photographs

Author : TIME-LIFE BOOKS

ISBN10 : 1618938851

Publisher : Time Inc. Books

Number of Pages : 272

Category : History

Viewed : 742

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Book Summary:

The name TIME-LIFE has become synonymous with providing readers with a deeper understanding of subjects and world events that matter to us all. TIME-LIFE The Civil War in 500 Photographs is an indispensable guide to a nation-changing era and the military, social, economic, and political forces that shaped it.

TIME-LIFE The Civil War in 500 Photographs provides a fresh and accessible way to understand this conflict including details of the battles and battlefields, the political maneuverings, and the personalities who defined the war continue to fascinate citizens of all ages. It lays out the war's major developments in arresting, colorized images and cover topics from the backstory through secession, the Union's early setbacks, the Underground Railroad, victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg, and Reconstruction.

For history buffs and the newly curious, The Civil War in 500 Photographs is the ultimate, easy-to-use guide to four years that changed our nation forever.

Meade and Lee After Gettysburg

Author : Jeffrey Wm Hunt

ISBN10 : 1611213444

Publisher : Grub Street Publishers

Number of Pages : 312

Category : History

Viewed : 648

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Book Summary: This “very satisfying blow-by-blow account of the final stages of the Gettysburg Campaign” fills an important gap in Civil War history (Civil War Books and Authors). Winner of the Gettysburg Civil War Round Table Book Award This fascinating book exposes what has been hiding in plain sight for 150 years: The Gettysburg Campaign did not end at the banks of the Potomac on July 14, but deep in central Virginia two weeks later along the line of the Rappahannock. Contrary to popular belief, once Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia slipped across the Potomac back to Virginia, the Lincoln administration pressed George Meade to cross quickly in pursuit—and he did. Rather than follow in Lee’s wake, however, Meade moved south on the east side of the Blue Ridge Mountains in a cat-and-mouse game to outthink his enemy and capture the strategic gaps penetrating the high wooded terrain. Doing so would trap Lee in the northern reaches of the Shenandoah Valley and potentially bring about the decisive victory that had eluded Union arms north of the Potomac. The two weeks that followed resembled a grand chess match with everything at stake—high drama filled with hard marching, cavalry charges, heavy skirmishing, and set-piece fighting that threatened to escalate into a major engagement with the potential to end the war in the Eastern Theater. Throughout, one thing remains clear: Union soldiers from private to general continued to fear the lethality of Lee’s army. Meade and Lee After Gettysburg, the first of three volumes on the campaigns waged between the two adversaries from July 14 through the end of July, 1863, relies on the official records, regimental histories, letters, newspapers, and other sources to provide a day-by-day account of this fascinating high-stakes affair. The vivid prose, coupled with original maps and outstanding photographs, offers a significant contribution to Civil War literature. Named Eastern Theater Book of the Year by Civil War Books and Authors

StuartÕs Tarheels

Author : Chris J. Hartley

ISBN10 : 0786486902

Publisher : McFarland

Number of Pages : 445

Category : History

Viewed : 416

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Book Summary: When Confederate Major General J.E.B. Stuart said “North Carolina has done nobly in this army,” he had one of his own men to thank: Brigadier General James Byron Gordon. A protégé of Stuart, Gordon was the consummate nineteenth-century landowner, politician, and businessman. Despite a lack of military training, he rose rapidly through the ranks and, as the commander of all North Carolina cavalrymen in the Army of Northern Virginia, he helped bring unparalleled success to Stuart’s famed Confederate cavalry. This updated biography, originally published in 1996, chronicles Gordon’s early life and military career and, through his men, takes a fresh look at the vaunted Army of Northern Virginia—its battles, controversies, and troops. This second edition includes additional source material that has come to light and a roster of Gordon’s 1st North Carolina Cavalry.

The Civil War in Loudoun County, Virginia

Author : Stevan F. Meserve,James A. Morgan III

ISBN10 : 1614230455

Publisher : Arcadia Publishing

Number of Pages : 128

Category : History

Viewed : 1065

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Book Summary: A no-man’s land through which raiding armies frequently passed, Loudoun County, Virginia, was itself a land of divided loyalties—one in three voters rejected secession in 1861—but with each new regiment came strengthened resolve to salvage their shattered lives despite defeat and military occupation. In this look at Loudoun County’s role in the Civil War, historian Stevan Meserve narrates not only the large-scale fighting at Ball’s Bluff in 1861 and in the Loudoun Valley cavalry battles of 1863, but also the lives of the citizens who sacrificed their crops and livestock, cared for the wounded and buried the dead of storied regiments such as White’s Comanches, Cole’s Potomac Home Brigade, Mosby’s Rangers and the Independent Loudoun Rangers. Drawing upon military accounts and other historical documents, The Civil War in Loudoun County celebrates their eventual triumph and the vibrant communities that exist today.

Homeward Bound

Author : William B. Holberton

ISBN10 : 0811746895

Publisher : Stackpole Books

Number of Pages : 195

Category : History

Viewed : 1672

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Book Summary: What happened to the hundreds of thousands of men in the Union and Confederate armies after they lay down their arms? According to William Holberton, many of these men had miles to travel before they were discharged from service, and the passage of these miles included some rather unique situations and experiences. As always, there was bureaucratic red tape and mishandled orders, and in some cases, tragic accidents, such as the Sultana disaster. Beginning with the surrender at Appomattox Court House, the author takes the reader through all the aspects and phases of demobilization, including the Grand Review in Washington, the desertions of soldiers overly eager to return home, the differences between Union and Confederate demobilization, the repatriation of prisoners of war, and the deferred demobilization of many black troops. The late William Holberton was a retired priest living in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. He spent the years since his retirement researching and writing Homeward Bound, his first book. He had previously published related articles in magazines such as Civil War Times Illustrated.

Dragoon Or Cavalryman, Major General John Buford In The American Civil War [Illustrated Edition]

Author : Major Mark R. Stricker

ISBN10 : 1782895019

Publisher : Pickle Partners Publishing

Number of Pages : 129

Category : History

Viewed : 1273

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Book Summary: Includes more than 25 maps and illustrations This study investigates the American Civil War role and contributions of Major General John Buford. Buford, a 1848 graduate of the United States Military Academy, began his Army career on America’s frontier with the First United States Dragoons. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Buford was selected to command a cavalry brigade in John Pope’s Army of Virginia, and participated in the Second Manassas Campaign. Buford went on to make significant contributions to the Union efforts in the Eastern Theater; however, history has generally portrayed Buford as a one-dimensional character based on his stand along McPherson and Seminary Ridges on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Several historians have presumed that the dismounted cavalry (or Dragoon) tactics used by Buford at Gettysburg were the culmination of a method of fighting which he helped develop and propagate within the Union cavalry. However, this thesis shows that contrary to this Dragoon image, Buford was in fact a remarkable cavalry officer. His battlefield tactics were fairly traditional, but it was not in pitched battles that Buford excelled. His significant contributions were in the established roles of cavalry; performing reconnaissance and providing security for the army he was supporting.

Lee's Lieutenants Third Volume Abridged

Author : Douglas Southall Freeman

ISBN10 : 9781451603255

Publisher : Simon and Schuster

Number of Pages : 912

Category : History

Viewed : 1698

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Book Summary: Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command is the most colorful and popular of Douglas Southall Freeman's works. A sweeping narrative that presents a multiple biography against the flame-shot background of the American Civil War, it is the story of the great figures of the Army of Northern Virginia who fought under Robert E. Lee. The Confederacy won resounding victories throughout the war, but seldom easily or without tremendous casualties. Death was always on the heels of fame, but the men who commanded -- among them Jackson, Longstreet, and Ewell -- developed as leaders and men. Lee's Lieutenants follows these men to the costly battle at Gettysburg, through the deepening twilight of the South's declining military might, and finally to the collapse of Lee's command and his formal surrender in 1865. To his unparalleled descriptions of men and operations, Dr. Freeman adds an insightful analysis of the lessons learned and their bearing upon the future military development of the nation. Accessible at last in a one-volume edition abridged by noted Civil War historian Stephen W. Sears, Lee's Lieutenants is essential reading for all Civil War buffs, students of war, and admirers of the historian's art as practiced at its very highest level.

Lee's Lieutenants

Author : Douglas Southall Freeman

ISBN10 : 0743213467

Publisher : Simon and Schuster

Number of Pages : 912

Category : History

Viewed : 748

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Book Summary: Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command is the most colorful and popular of Douglas Southall Freeman's works. A sweeping narrative that presents a multiple biography against the flame-shot background of the American Civil War, it is the story of the great figures of the Army of Northern Virginia who fought under Robert E. Lee. The Confederacy won resounding victories throughout the war, but seldom easily or without tremendous casualties. Death was always on the heels of fame, but the men who commanded -- among them Jackson, Longstreet, and Ewell -- developed as leaders and men. Lee's Lieutenants follows these men to the costly battle at Gettysburg, through the deepening twilight of the South's declining military might, and finally to the collapse of Lee's command and his formal surrender in 1865. To his unparalleled descriptions of men and operations, Dr. Freeman adds an insightful analysis of the lessons learned and their bearing upon the future military development of the nation. Accessible at last in a one-volume edition abridged by noted Civil War historian Stephen W. Sears, Lee's Lieutenants is essential reading for all Civil War buffs, students of war, and admirers of the historian's art as practiced at its very highest level.